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Ink

Top shows: Masta Killa, a tribute to Pink Floyd and more

A tribute to Pink Floyd promises to re-examine the catalog of the popular yet still inscrutable classic rock band.

Crashdïet

Bobby Rush

Rev Gusto

Milo Greene

Alt-J

Adrenaline Mob

Ink

Milo Greene

Friday

RecordBar

Milo Greene overlays the indie-folk mannerisms of Sufjan Stevens with the classic rock harmonies of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young. The Los Angeles-based quintet is capable of pleasing both discerning fans of alternative rock and curmudgeons who stopped listening to new music after Fleetwood Mac released “Rumours” in 1977. The approach has positioned Milo Greene on the fast track to stardom. Opening act the Kopecky Family Band is also in tune with the tenor of the times. The Nashville-based collective crafts music that features fashionably au courant stomping and shouting as part of its colossal arrangements.

Tickets to the 10 p.m. show are $15 in advance.

Bill Brownlee, Special to Ink

Claire and the Crowded Stage and Rev Gusto

Friday

Coda

Aside from their mutual bases in Kansas City and an affinity for music from earlier eras, Claire and the Crowded Stage and Rev Gusto have little in common. Yet the wildly different acts share a bill Friday at Coda. Replete with clarinet and accordion, the spirited chansons of Claire and the Crowded Stage seem as if they belong in a French bistro. The inspiration behind the name of the large ensemble will be unmistakably conspicuous at the intimate venue on Broadway Boulevard. The strikingly young musicians in Rev Gusto (above) re-create the garage rock of the mid-1960s with astonishing authority.

The cover charge for the 9 p.m. show is $5.

Bill Brownlee, Special to Ink

Masta Killa

Wednesday

Riot Room

There’s probably not a single hip-hop fan in Kansas City who wouldn’t trade every one of the recent area appearances by individual members of the Wu-Tang Clan for a single concert by the entirety of the famed collective. Even so, solo performances by representatives of the legendary hip-hop group from Staten Island are better than nothing. Masta Killa, one of the lesser-known contributors to the Wu-Tang Clan, has forged a sporadic but compelling solo career. All of the projects released under his name are worthwhile. Masta Killa’s recurring themes include nostalgia for the late 1980s, a healthy respect for vintage R&B and a curiously retroactive interest in socially conscious rapping.

Tickets to the 8 p.m. show are $10 in advance.

Bill Brownlee, Special to Ink

Lucy Rose

Thursday

Czar

Lucy Rose doesn’t require an introduction in her homeland. The singer/songwriter is a well-known artist in England. In a positive review of her 2012 album “Like I Used To,” the influential music publication NME called Rose “cool, connected and posh” and “fantastically radio-friendly.” The suggestion that Rose sounds like Adele by way of Bon Iver gives unfamiliar Americans the gist of her appeal. Catching the up-and-coming Rose at the Czar Bar represents a unique opportunity for Anglophiles and advocates of intelligent pop. Eyelit, a sparkling folk-rock duo from St. Joseph, opens the show.

Tickets to the 7 p.m. show are $8 in advance.

Bill Brownlee, Special to Ink

Sonic Spectrum tribute to Pink Floyd

Sunday

RecordBar

Rather than merely re-creating the sounds associated with other musicians, participants in the most rewarding tribute shows offer fresh insights into familiar music. Thoughtfully curated by Robert Moore of the long-running “Sonic Spectrum” radio program, Sunday’s tribute to Pink Floyd (right) promises to re-examine the catalog of the popular yet still inscrutable classic rock band. The Anderson Council, the evening’s headliners, features several of Kansas City’s elite musicians, including Kent Burnham, Mark Lowrey and Jeff Harshbarger. Another set of contributors will offer reggae and soul versions of Pink Floyd’s songs. Monta at Odds and members of She’s a Keeper and U.S. Americans will dispense additional illumination.

Tickets to the 8 p.m. show are $10 in advance.

Bill Brownlee, Special to Ink

Alt-J

Tuesday (April 2)

The Midland

Fans of Alt-J are advised to ignore the naysayers who accuse the British rock sensation of sounding like Dave Matthews fronting Radiohead. Yet there’s a bit of truth behind the disparaging suggestion. Alt-J manages to fuse the art-rock associated with Radiohead with Matthews’ offbeat accessibility. The oddly appealing result made Alt-J one of the most notable breakout bands of 2012. Its debut album, “An Awesome Wave,” won the prestigious Mercury Prize last year. Although opening act Hundred Waters is signed to dubstep star Skrillex’s record label, the lush approach of the Florida-based band evokes the output of Bjork and the Dirty Projectors. Tuesday’s concert is sold out.

Tickets to the sold-out 8 p.m. show have a face value of $9.65.

Bill Brownlee, Special to Ink

Crashdïet

Tuesday

Czar

The trashy spirit of the California-based metal bands of the 1990s like Mötley Crüe, Poison and Quiet Riot is alive and well in Sweden. Crashdïet, a notoriously reckless and decadent group from Stockholm, doesn’t merely revive the debauched glam of its inspirations. The members of Crashdïet have perfected the fashion and sound of that era. Their Swedish tour mates Crucified Barbara apply a feminine perspective to a similarly sinful sensibility. Snäkeskyn Whïskey offers a Canadian version of the depraved music. Who needs tribute bands? Tuesday’s vital triple-bill offers a living and breathing homage to the glory days of hair metal.

Tickets to the 8 p.m. show are $10 in advance.

Bill Brownlee, Special to Ink

Bobby Rush

Thursday

Knuckleheads, Living Room

The highlight of Bobby Rush’s concerts has long been a lewd demonstration of the female form. Those risqué shenanigans probably won’t be a part of Thursday’s performance at the snug Living Room at Knuckleheads. At 77, Rush is making a late-career transition from a bawdy entertainer to a respectable elder statesman of the blues. Once known primarily among denizens of what’s pejoratively known at the chitlin’ circuit, the Louisiana native is a featured attraction at this year’s Chicago Blues Festival. While it contains some of Rush’s bawdy humor, his new Down in Louisiana album showcases a more thoughtful side of the fascinating blues legend.

Tickets to the 8 p.m. show are $25 in advance.

Bill Brownlee, Special to Ink

Adrenaline Mob

Tuesday

VooDoo Lounge

The heavy metal supergroup Adrenaline Mob includes members of Disturbed, Dream Theater and Symphony X. Those bands are known for their conceptual complexity as well as for their audacious displays of technical dexterity. All such pretensions are abandoned by Adrenaline Mob. Powered by superstar drummer Mike Portnoy, the band is dedicated to fun. Vocalist Russell Allen wails while guitar hero Mike Orlando shreds. Like a lot of great metal, the result is gloriously dumb. The presence of openers Nothing More, an exceptionally dynamic live act from San Antonio, makes Tuesday’s show even more noteworthy. Alice Sweet Alice, a hard rock band from Kansas City, kicks things off.

Tickets to the 7:30 p.m. show are $10 in advance.

Bill Brownlee, Special to Ink

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