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Ink

Edward Sharpe concert pauses for a surprise wedding

Jordan Hayes and Desiree Beaupre have been dating for nine years. On Saturday, they married each other on stage at the Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros concert at Crossroads KC.

Ink

Desiree Beaupre planned to stay for only a couple of songs.

On her break, the manager of Grinders watched from backstage as Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros performed at Crossroads KC on Saturday.

Her boyfriend, Jordan Hayes, kept urging her to stay for one more song. He wanted her to stay at least until the band started playing “Home,” its most popular song and a sentimental favorite of many.

They’d both been to the Edward Sharpe concert at the Crossroads last year, and so they weren’t surprised when the band started playing an interlude in the middle of the song and passed around a microphone to the crowd.

But Beaupre was shocked when the band’s female vocalist, Jade Castrinos, walked backstage and started calling out the name of Beaupre’s boyfriend: “Jordan? Is Jordan here?”

Castrinos walked between the couple and said to Hayes, “Are you still going to propose?”

His cover was blown, but Hayes did more than propose. On Saturday night, Hayes and Beaupre were married on stage as more than 2,200 people watched, according to Grinders owner Jeff Rumaner, also known as Stretch.

The band was playing the chords from “Home” in the background as Hayes and Beaupre stepped onstage.

“Desiree, you’ve always been there for me. I just want you to know, I’ll always be there for you. Will you marry me — right here? Right now?” Hayes said, getting down on one knee.

Beaupre said yes, and Hayes had already planned what happened next.

“Is there — Is there an ordained minister in the —” he started saying.

But before he could finish the phrase, Christian Letts, a guitarist in the band, raised his hand.

After a quick exchange of vows, Letts told Hayes he could kiss his bride, and the ceremony ended with a 12-second kiss where Hayes lifted Beaupre off the ground. The crowd was already ecstatic during the ceremony, but with that long kiss, the audience went wild.

When the band picked up playing “Home,” the newlyweds stayed onstage to play the tambourines, and they shared their first dance during the next song: a cover of “Sea of Love.”

About a month ago, Hayes hatched his plan to get married at the Edward Sharpe concert. He’d been looking for an inventive way to ask his girlfriend of nine years to marry him, and he thought that because Edward Sharpe conveys such a feeling of community and togetherness, this would be the perfect concert for an engagement.

Rumaner reached out to promoters to make it happen, but it wasn’t until the morning of the concert that Hayes found out that his plan would go through.

“It was like three weeks of me being like, ‘Have you heard anything yet? Have you heard anything yet?’ That morning I woke up to a message on my phone saying, ‘You’re good,’” Hayes said.

Beaupre is still in shock. A wedding usually comes months after a proposal, not seconds. But in the moment, she says she didn’t have a doubt.

“I’ve never given him enough credit for being so romantic like that,” she said.

After the couple shared their first dance, it was time for Beaupre to get back to work at Grinders. She did get married on the clock, after all.

The couple don’t have plans for their honeymoon. They haven’t talked about it yet, Beaupre says. But she knows what their next step is.

“Tomorrow” — that would be Tuesday — “we’re going to go to the courthouse and get it done legally.”

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